Clonezilla License Agreement

Clonezilla License Agreement

For a limited time of 18 months after the general availability of Windows 7 or the release of a Windows 7 service pack, whichever is earlier, the OEM license for Windows 7 Professional and Windows 7 includes Ultimate downgrade rights on Windows XP Professional. After this period, the OEM license allows you to downgrade rights on Windows Vista Business. this first line I removed – the underlying license too – is not only VL (had to search and verify Da_Schmoo information (which was 100% exactly) This need for legal analysis is one of the reasons why it is strongly discouraged to create new OSS licenses: it can be extremely difficult, expensive and tedious to analyze the interaction of many different licenses. It is usually much better to stick to licenses that have already been subject to legal scrutiny and are widely spread in the commercial world. Yes. OEM downgrade rights for desktop operating systems apply to Windows Vista Business and Windows Vista Ultimate, as set forth in the license terms. Please note that OEM versions of Windows Vista Business and Windows Vista Ultimate are limited to Windows XP Professional (including Windows XP Tablet PC Edition and Windows XP x64 Edition). End users can use the following media for their downgrade: volume license media (provided the end user has a volume license agreement), a retail CD (FPP), or a system builder hologram CD (provided the software is purchased in accordance with the Microsoft OEM Builder license). Use of the degraded operating system is subject to the Windows Vista Business license terms, and the end user cannot use both the Downgrade operating system and Windows Vista Business.

No discount rights are granted for Windows Vista Home Basic or Windows Vista Home Premium. “Large PC manufacturers, known as original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), have the ability to pre-enable Microsoft software┬« Windows XP installed on new PCs. Therefore, [u]End users typically do not need to activate the software during the setup process by entering the product key [/u] that is on the COA Key connected to the PC. To reduce a significant source of hacking, Microsoft has disabled online activation for COA keys connected to PCs pre-activated by OEMs. This change is expected to have only minimal impact on licensed users who typically do not use their COA key to activate the software, as it has been pre-activated by the OEM. However, if a licensed end user needs to activate because OEM preactivation does not work as expected (for example. B after replacing a faulty motherboard), it can do so via phone activation. “(Although it is not acceptable to be able to represent a pro version on computers that come with Home OS for example. In this case, the volume licensing route would be the right one) These definitions of U.S. law govern the U.S. acquisition rules, namely the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS).

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